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Division notes passing of Curt Stickel, former historic-site interpreter

Written on: September 17th, 2018 in Museums News Uncategorized

The Delaware Division of Historical and Cultural Affairs notes, with sadness, the passing of Curt Stickel, a former historic-site interpreter who served at The Old State House and the Delaware Archaeology Museum in Dover between 2002 and 2013. Stickel, who was 66 years old, died on Sept. 1, 2018. Several members of the division staff were in attendance at his memorial service which took place in Milford, Del. on Sept. 14.

Curt Stickel in Colonial-period garb in 2007.

Curt Stickel in Colonial-period garb in 2007.

Charles Curtis Stickel was born in Wilmington, Del. in 1952 and graduated from Claymont High School in 1970. He later earned a bachelor’s degree in English from the University of Delaware and a master’s degree in liberal studies. A passionate thespian, Stickel was active for many years in writing, directing and acting in theatrical productions by the Milford Second Street Players.

After a 30-year career teaching English and theater in Milford, Stickel joined the division staff as a historic-site interpreter at The Old State House where he was actively involved in conducting tours of the museum, as well as creating plays and serving as a historical re-enactor portraying a wide variety of characters including noted Delawareans Gunning Bedford Jr., one of the founding fathers of the United States, and Dr. James Tilton, the nation’s first surgeon general of the Army.

Tom Welch, who played Allen McLane opposite Stickel’s Gunning Bedford in the Old State House play “A Day with Bedford and McLane,” noted that “Everyone who worked with Curt had the utmost respect for him. He was an incredibly creative, congenial and dynamic person who will be greatly missed.”

Old State House site supervisor Nena Todd commented on Stickel’s ability to command the attention of an audience, a talent that she attributes to his years in the theater. He was my role model when it came to historical interpretation,” she noted. “He knew how to project his voice to a large group and taught me how to tell a story in an exciting way. On top of that, he had a great sense of humor. … I’ll always have the fondest memories of my time working with him.”

Go to the following for more information on the life of Curt Stickel.


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