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  Archived Posts From: 2017

exhibits

Kalmar Nyckel Foundation mounts new exhibit on Wilmington’s industrial past

Written on: June 28th, 2017 in ExhibitsNews

A new exhibit, entitled “Wilmington—Industrial Powerhouse,” opened to the public on June 21, 2017 at the Kalmar Nyckel Foundation’s Copeland Maritime Center located at 1124 E. Seventh St. in Wilmington, Del.

Section of the exhibit “Wilmington—Industrial Powerhouse"

Section of the exhibit “Wilmington—Industrial Powerhouse”

The exhibit highlights 125 years of industrial production and the four major manufacturing plants that dominated an outsized portion of America’s shipbuilding and railcar history between 1836 and 1945— Harlan and Hollingsworth, Pusey and Jones, Jackson and Sharp, and the Dravo Corporation—and the workers who built 10,000 ships and 30,000 railcars.

The exhibit was financed, in part, with funding from the National Park Service’s National Maritime Heritage Grant Program which is administered in Delaware by the Division of Historical and Cultural Affairs. However, the contents or opinions contained in the exhibit do not necessarily reflect the views or policies of the National Park Service or the division.

 


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collections

Portraits of former Gov. and Mrs. Markell added to the State Portrait Collection

Written on: June 28th, 2017 in CollectionsExhibitsNews

The State of Delaware unveiled the official portraits of former Gov. Jack Markell and former Delaware first lady Carla Markell during ceremonies that took place in Dover on June 13, 2017. Both portraits were painted by David Larned.

Unveiling ceremony of former Gov. Jack Markell’s portrait at Legislative Hall. (From rear left) Gov. John Carney and David Larned. (From left foreground) Sadie Larned, Elaine Markell, Molly Markell, former Delaware first lady Carla Markell, former Gov. Markell and Lt. Gov. Bethany Hall-Long

Unveiling ceremony of former Gov. Jack Markell’s portrait at Legislative Hall. (From rear left) Gov. John Carney and David Larned. (From left foreground) Sadie Larned, Elaine Markell, Molly Markell, former Delaware first lady Carla Markell, former Gov. Markell and Lt. Gov. Bethany Hall-Long

In the first ceremony, which took place at Legislative Hall, Gov. John Carney and a host of dignitaries celebrated the unveiling of Gov. Markell’s portrait which has since joined the portraits of many of Delaware’s chief executives dating back to Thomas McKean, the 2nd president of Delaware who served in 1777. The portraits of the state’s governors are displayed in the building’s Hall of Governors. Markell family members attending the ceremony included Governor and Mrs. Markell, their daughter Molly, Gov. Markell’s mother Elaine and Mrs. Markell’s mother Joan.

In the second ceremony, which took place at Woodburn, the Governor’s Residence, Lt. Gov. Bethany Hall-Long assisted former Gov. Markell in unveiling Mrs. Markell’s portrait which has since joined the residence’s collection of first-lady portraits dating back to Mrs. Gunning Bedford.

Former Gov. Jack Markell with the portrait of former Delaware first lady Carla Markell

Former Gov. Jack Markell with the portrait of former Delaware first lady Carla Markell

The Markell portraits are the latest additions to the State Portrait Collection which was founded in 1913 for the purpose of placing portraits of significant Delaware statesmen in public spaces. With the acquisition of its first work in 1802—an imposing portrait of George Washington painted by Denis A. Volozan—this collection has grown to include more than 200 works, in a variety of media, of many of the state’s most notable public figures including governors, first ladies, members of Congress, legislators, judges, military personnel and a variety of other political and historical figures. Notable artists whose works are represented in the collection include John Wollaston, James Claypoole, John Hesselius, John Trumbull, Thomas Sully, Howard Pyle, Frank Schoonover, Ethel P.B. Leach, N.C. Wyeth, Orville Peets, Charles Parks, Simmie Knox and Jamie Wyeth. Portraits are either purchased with a combination of public and private funds or received as donations and designated for the portrait collection.

Portrait of George Washington by Denis A. Volozan, oil on canvas, 7' by 5', 1802.The Old State House, Dover, Del.

Portrait of George Washington by Denis A. Volozan, oil on canvas, 7′ by 5′, 1802.The Old State House, Dover, Del.

The State Portrait Collection is administered by the Delaware Division of Historical and Cultural Affairs which is responsible for the care and control of the state’s varied assemblage of museum objects, archaeological artifacts, works of art and archival materials.

Visitors can see items from the portrait collection at a variety of locations across the state, most notably, through guided tours of Legislative Hall and Woodburn, or by visiting The Old State House which houses the Washington portrait as well as portraits of War of 1812 heroes Commodores Jacob Jones and Thomas Macdonough painted by Thomas Sully. Go to those organization’s websites for days and hours of visitation.

For press coverage of the portrait unveiling ceremony at Legislative Hall, go to the following:

Former Del. governor legacy lives through portrait
WMDT-TV, Salisbury, Md.—June 13, 2017

 


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historic-sites

State fiscal year 2017 review: Delaware properties listed in the National Register of Historic Places

Written on: June 27th, 2017 in Historic SitesNewsPreservation

By Madeline Dunn, Delaware Division of Historical and Cultural Affairs’ historian and National Register of Historic Places coordinator

Preserving Our Past for a Better Future: Delaware’s Historic Preservation Plan, 2013–2017” provides an opportunity for people throughout the state to become involved with the preservation of their historic heritage. One program which enables people to identify, evaluate, conduct research, and write about historic properties is the National Register of Historic Places. Established by the National Historic Preservation Act of 1966, this program authorizes the National Park Service to create and maintain an official list of historic properties deemed worthy of preservation at the local, state, or national level. Currently the national list contains 92,375 historic properties including 739 nominations from Delaware.

Interior of the home at 901 Mt. Lebanon Road in Rockland, Del. that was listed in the National Register of Historic Places in 2017. The image is from a 1955 photo shoot for “Better Homes and Gardens” magazine.

Interior of the home at 901 Mount Lebanon Road in Rockland, Del. that was listed in the National Register of Historic Places in 2017. The image is from a 1955 photo shoot for “Better Homes and Gardens” magazine.

Delaware’s State Historic Preservation Office administers this program and throughout the past fiscal year processed seven nominations for review by the National Park Service. Six historic properties were listed in the National Register and one nomination is pending. Participation in this program provided Delawareans with an opportunity to make contributions to the statewide preservation plan by engaging them in the process of studying 20th-century properties, expressing an interest in the preservation of agricultural land, identifying and documenting buildings associated with underrepresented communities, conducting research, and writing nominations.

Individuals participating in the process included private property owners, research consultants, graduate students, county and town officials, church-congregation members, members of special interest groups, citizens serving on preservation review-boards, as well as professionals at the city, county, state, and federal levels. As a result, several preservation partnerships were either established and/or enhanced.

Four nominations associated with 20th-century architecture were listed this spring. These nominations included the Downtown Wilmington Commercial Historic District (listed on March 24, 2017) and two private residences—901 Mount Lebanon Road in Rockland (March 28, 2017) and the Jackson-Wilson House in Wilmington (April 10, 2017). Another historic property, Holly Oak (April 10, 2017), though constructed in the 18th century, was modified during the 20th-century in the Colonial Revival style. The rural New Castle County property known as the Cox-Phillips-Mitchell Agricultural Complex (March 13, 2017) documented farm buildings and chronicled information about Delaware’s agriculture industry. Finally, the listing of St. Paul African Methodist Episcopal Church (Oct. 17, 2016) in Harrington documented information about the establishment of the A.M.E. Church in Delaware as well as the congregation’s importance within a rural Kent County community.

Prior to submitting nominations to the National Park Service, Delaware’s State Review Board for Historic Preservation reviews the nominations and recommends that they be considered for listing in the National Register. The ten members serving on this special review-board represent professional preservationists including archaeologists, architects, architectural historians, historians, and preservation planners, as well as citizen members.

Four members of the Delaware State Review Board for Historic Preservation during a recent meeting. (From left) James Ellison, Esthelda Parker-Selby, Carol Quigley and chairman Tony DePrima

Four members of the Delaware State Review Board for Historic Preservation during a recent meeting. (From left) James Ellison, Esthelda Parker-Selby, Carol Quigley and chairman Tony DePrima

The State Historic Preservation Office invites individuals interested in learning more about the National Register Program or volunteering to assist with archival research and the writing of National Register nominations to contact Madeline Dunn, National Register coordinator-historian at madeline.dunn@state.de.us.

Delaware properties added to the National Register of Historic Places in fiscal year 2017

The Downtown Wilmington Commercial District was listed in the National Register under two criteria: Criterion A—commerce and Criterion C—architecture. This historic district, containing 66 buildings, incorporates properties located in the 600 through 800 blocks of Market Street, the 700 and 800 blocks of adjacent Shipley Street, and the unit block of East Seventh Street. These properties represent buildings associated with the commercial heart of the downtown area between 1870 and 1968. The district is representative of the dynamic forces including the arrival of electric trolleys, an evolution in residential patterns, and the resulting concentration of business interests that transformed Market Street into a highly concentrated downtown commercial environment that prospered through much of the early-20th century. The nomination also provides contrasts and comparisons reflective of the city’s commercial growth, references specific reasons for the district’s commercial transition, and chronicles decades of changes denoting architectural, social, and economic trends.

Structures within this district represent a unique concentration of small- to mid-size commercial buildings dating from the late-19th to the mid-20th centuries. A variety of architectural styles including the Italianate, Second Empire, Beaux Arts, Commercial, Mission Revival, Art Deco, and Art Moderne are present in the district and parallel national trends in the design of commercial buildings during this period. Local architects responsible for designing many of these buildings include William Draper Brinckloe, Clarence R. Hope, Charles Barton Keen, Edward L. Rice, John Dockery Thompson, and the architectural firms of Brown & Whiteside; Hoggson Brothers; and Robinson, Stanhope, and Manning.

Street scene in the Downtown Wilmington Commercial District

Street scene in the Downtown Wilmington Commercial District

Located at 901 Mount Lebanon Road in Rockland, the original section of this house was built in 1950 and was eligible for listing in the National Register under Criterion C— architecture. “901” is a well-documented example of organic architecture espoused by Frank Lloyd Wright and other early advocates of modern house design. The horizontal orientation of the house, its organic relationship to the surrounding landscape, its rational design based on interior space, and the forward-looking style of the house and its builders make “901” a significant, one-of-a-kind artifact of the post-World-War-II era in Delaware.

The builders and owners, Dr. Davis Durham and his wife Harriet Frorer Durham, were distinguished residents in the village of Rockland. They hired a Philadelphia-area architect named Jesse Stetler to design a house that would capitalize on the panoramic view from their hilltop building site.

The architectural integrity of the original house remains high, though some modifications and expansions were made in 1973. These enhancements, being sensitive in design and materials used, neither detracted from nor compromised the integrity of the original house. They merely provided accommodations and spaces which met the changing needs of the Durham family whose descendants continue to reside on the premises today.

901 Mount Lebanon Road, Rockland, Del.

901 Mount Lebanon Road, Rockland, Del.

Located at 12 Red Oak Road in the Rockford Park section of Wilmington, the Jackson-Wilson House was built in 1914 and was eligible for listing in the National Register under Criterion C as a locally significant example of the English Tudor Revival style based on the architecture of the Cotswold area of south-central England. Reflecting this style, popular in the early-20th century, the home is an outstanding example of this national trend at the local level. Designed by the New York City architectural firm, Shape and Bready, the property is exceptionally grand in size and scale for Wilmington.

The house was originally constructed for Willard Cartwright Jackson and his wife Josephine Willauer Jackson. Mr. Jackson was the secretary-treasurer of the Wilmington Automobile Company. Joseph Shields Wilson and his wife Lois Martenis Wilson eventually acquired the property. Mr. Wilson served as mayor of Wilmington from 1905 to 1907, and again from 1946 to 1949.

Jackson-Wilson House

Jackson-Wilson House

Holly Oak, located at 1503 Ridge Road in Claymont, was eligible for listing in the National Register under Criterion C—architecture. Constructed in 1779, the dwelling is architecturally significant under the historic context, Stone Dwellings of Brandywine Hundred, as an early extant example of a hall-parlor plan built of stone. It is also significant as a Colonial Revival Stone Dwelling for its early 20th–century renovations.

The house was constructed as a residence for the Perkins family who owned the land for about 160 years. Documents suggest that by the 1850s, the property was utilized as a tenant house. John H. Longstreet, president of the Philadelphia Real Estate Investment Company and the president and treasurer of the Lawndale Land Company, bought the property in 1889. Longstreet reassembled the original 154-acre tract of land that once belonged to the Perkins family, along with additional acreage, and plotted the residential subdivision named “Holly Oak” in 1901.

Holly Oak

Holly Oak

The Cox-Phillips-Mitchell Agricultural Complex, located at 1651 and 1655 Old Wilmington Road in Hockessin, was eligible for listing in the National Register under Criterion A as an excellent example of the practice of remodeling agricultural complexes in Delaware during the 19th and early-20th centuries.

In the first half of the 19th century, a variety of social and economic factors combined to transform the agricultural landscape of northern Delaware, including the agricultural reform movement, an increase in population, rising prices of farmland, and improvements in transportation. This transformation took the form of changes in building materials, architectural styles, construction methods, and spatial arrangements, affecting both dwellings and agricultural buildings and aimed at increasing agricultural production and farm efficiency.

Expansions of house plans and new types of agricultural outbuildings, such as dairy barns, also accompanied and followed this trend. From the second half of the 19th century to the early-20th century, farmers in the Delaware Piedmont turned to dairying on a commercial scale, resulting in further changes to their barns and farm complexes. They built larger barns, specifically designed to support milking operations, and modified them over time to meet the ever-changing state regulations. Supporting agricultural outbuildings for equipment and crop storage also changed in this period to accommodate changes in machinery and the scale of production. Both the dwelling and the bank barn at Cox-Phillips-Mitchell Complex represent multiple periods of construction and adaptation, while the various other buildings demonstrate experimentation with efficiency. The farm also features several unusual combination buildings including a chicken coop/piggery and corncrib/granary.

The house and original outbuildings were built by William Cox who acquired the property in 1721. The house and outbuildings were expanded over the years by subsequent owners including William Phillips (a cooper who owned the property between 1766 and 1830) and John Mitchell who purchased the farm in 1868 and whose descendants continue to reside on the premises today.

Cox-Phillips-Mitchell Agricultural Complex

Cox-Phillips-Mitchell Agricultural Complex

St. Paul A.M.E. Church, located at 103 W. Mispillion St. in Harrington, Del., was eligible for listing in the National Register under Criterion A because of its association with the establishment of the African Methodist Episcopal Church in Delaware during the early-19th century. This structure represents the last of the 11 A.M.E. churches built in Kent County, Del. between 1867 and 1895. Its congregation was established in 1830, 17 years after the African Methodist Episcopal Church was organized in 1813 by Richard Allen and one year before his death. Worship was held in homes of congregational members for many years. In 1895, the members constructed a church on New Street, located on the east side of town. The locally-known African American house-mover Bobby Russ and his mules Susie and Jennie physically moved the church to its West Mispillion Street location in the early 1900s.

St. Paul A.M.E. Church

St. Paul A.M.E. Church

 


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events

Division to sponsor 23 special events during July 2017

Written on: June 26th, 2017 in EventsHistoric SitesMuseumsNews

During the month of July 2017, the Delaware Division of Historical and Cultural Affairs will be sponsoring 23 special programs at sites across the state. A full schedule is included below. Except where noted, all programs are free and open to the public.

The program “John Philip Sousa: Stars and Stripes” will be featured at the Johnson Victrola Museum on July 1 and 4, 2017.

The program “John Philip Sousa: Stars and Stripes” will be featured at the Johnson Victrola Museum on July 1 and 4, 2017.

Delaware Division of Historical and Cultural Affairs special events, July 2017

Saturday July 1, 2017
Johnson Victrola Museum’s 50th Anniversary Celebration: A Marching Band’s Tale. In observance of Independence Day, the museum will present “John Philip Sousa: Stars and Stripes,” guided tours that explore patriotic music recorded by John Philip Sousa and other Victor artists accompanied by 78-rpm records played on authentic Victor Talking Machines. Part of a series of programs celebrating the museum’s creation in 1967. First Saturday in the First State program. Johnson Victrola Museum, 375 S. New St., Dover. 9 a.m.–4:30 p.m. 302-739-3262.

Saturday July 1, 2017
“Independence Day.” Screening of the film “Thunder and Rain” about Caesar Rodney’s historic ride to Philadelphia to break the tie for the Declaration of Independence. First Saturday in the First State program. The Old State House, 25 The Green, Dover. Film screenings at 11 a.m., 1 and 3 p.m. Museum open 9 a.m.–4:30 p.m. 302-744-5054.

Tuesday, July 4, 2017
Independence Day. All museums of the State of Delaware will be open: The Johnson Victrola Museum, open 9 a.m.–4:30 p.m.; The Old State House, open 9 a.m.–6 p.m.; the John Dickinson Plantation, New Castle Court House Museum and the Zwaanendael Museum, open 10 a.m.–4:30 p.m. 302-744-5054.

Tuesday, July 4, 2017
Johnson Victrola Museum’s 50th Anniversary Celebration: A Marching Band’s Tale. In observance of Independence Day, the museum will present “John Philip Sousa: Stars and Stripes,” guided tours that explore patriotic music recorded by John Philip Sousa and other Victor artists accompanied by 78-rpm records played on authentic Victor Talking Machines. Part of a series of programs celebrating the museum’s creation in 1967. Johnson Victrola Museum, 375 S. New St., Dover. 9 a.m.–4:30 p.m. 302-739-3262.

Tuesday, July 4, 2017
“Independence Day.” Screenings at 11 a.m., 1 and 3 p.m. of “Thunder and Rain,” a film about Caesar Rodney’s historic ride for independence. At 2 and 4 p.m., the bell of The Old State House will ring in celebration of the nation’s birthday, followed immediately by site interpreters, dressed in period clothing, who will recite the Declaration of Independence aloud from the spot where the document was first read to the citizens of Dover in 1776. The Old State House, 25 The Green, Dover. Museum open 9 a.m.–6 p.m. 302-744-5054.

Historical interpreters will recite the Declaration of Independence from the steps of Dover’s Old State House on July 4, 2017.

Historical interpreters will recite the Declaration of Independence from the steps of Dover’s Old State House on July 4, 2017.

Tuesday–Saturday, July 4–8, 2017
“Quill Pen Week.” Drop-in program in celebration of Independence Day provides instruction in quill-pen writing so that visitors can learn how to write like a “signer.” John Dickinson Plantation, 340 Kitts Hummock Road, Dover. Activities 11 a.m.–3 p.m. Museum open 10 a.m.–4:30 p.m. 302-739-3277.

Wednesdays, July 5, 12, 19 and 26, 2017
Lost Off Lewes: The British Warship DeBraak.” Special tour explores the 18th-century history, artifacts and the surviving hull section of this shipwreck. Zwaanendael Museum, 102 Kings Highway, Lewes. 9 a.m. Limited seating. Admission $10 (cash or check only). For reservations, e-mail hca_zmevents@state.de.us or call 302-645-1148.

Saturday, July 8, 2017
Demonstrations by the Thistledown Fiber Arts Guild. Program explores spinning, weaving, knitting and other fabric arts. John Dickinson Plantation, 340 Kitts Hummock Road, Dover. Program 1–3 p.m. Museum open 10 a.m.–4:30 p.m. 302-739-3277.

Friday, July 14, 2017
“The Golden Age of Jazz.” Screenings of Ken Burns’ documentary “Jazz.” Episode one, “Gumbo,” at 10:30 a.m. Episode two, “The Gift,” at Noon. Episode three, “Our Language,” at 2 p.m. Episode four, “The True Welcome,” at 4 p.m. Episode five, “Pure Pleasure,” at 6 p.m. Presented in partnership with the “Johnson Victrola Museum’s 50th Anniversary Celebration: A Jazz Tale,” a component of a series of programs celebrating the museum’s creation in 1967. Dover Public Library, 35 Loockerman Plaza, Dover. 302-736-7030.

Friday, July 14, 2017
Johnson Victrola Museum’s 50th Anniversary Celebration: A Jazz Tale. Lecture at 11 a.m.—“Duke Ellington and Rosedale Beach”—explores the history of the popular waterfront resort run by, and for, people of color which featured internationally renowned performers. Lecture at 1 p.m.—“Fats Waller”—explores the life and achievements of the noted jazz musician, accompanied by 78-rpm recordings played on authentic Victor Talking Machines. Lectures part of a series of programs celebrating the museum’s creation in 1967. Johnson Victrola Museum, 375 S. New St., Dover. Lectures in the museum’s 2nd floor gallery (entry via staircase; no elevator). Free admission but, due to space restrictions, reservations are required for the lectures by calling 302-739-3262. Museum also open 9 a.m.–4:30 p.m. featuring tours exploring the history of jazz.

Saturday, July 15, 2017
“The Golden Age of Jazz.” Screening of the following jazz-themed films: “Jazz on a Summer’s Day” about the 1958 Newport Jazz Festival at 10:30 a.m. Episode six, “Swing, the Victory of Celebration,” from Ken Burns’ documentary “Jazz” at 10:30 a.m. “Let’s Get Lost” about trumpeter Chet Baker at Noon. Episode seven, “Dedicated to Chaos,” from Burns’ “Jazz” at 12:30 p.m. Spike Lee’s “Mo’ Better Blues” at 2 p.m. Episode eight, “Risk,” from Burns’ “Jazz” at 2:30 p.m. Presented in partnership with the “Johnson Victrola Museum’s 50th Anniversary Celebration: A Jazz Tale,” a component of a series of programs celebrating the museum’s creation in 1967. Dover Public Library, 35 Loockerman Plaza, Dover. 302-736-7030.

Ken Burns’ documentary “Jazz” will be screened at the Dover Public Library on July 14, 15 and 16, 2017.

Ken Burns’ documentary “Jazz” will be screened at the Dover Public Library on July 14, 15 and 16, 2017.

Saturday, July 15, 2017
Johnson Victrola Museum’s 50th Anniversary Celebration: A Jazz Tale. Lecture at 11 a.m.—“All That Jazz”— explores the origins of jazz music, its early pioneers and the contributions made to the art form by Victor Records, accompanied by 78-rpm recordings played on authentic Victor Talking Machines. At 1 p.m. a musical ensemble from DonDel Enterprises will present “All That Jazz: From the Beginning” featuring songs and dances from the early days of jazz. Johnson Victrola Museum, 375 S. New St., Dover. Lecture and performance in the museum’s 2nd floor gallery (entry via staircase; no elevator). Free admission but, due to space restrictions, reservations are required for the special programs by calling 302-739-3262. Museum also open 9 a.m.–4:30 p.m. featuring tours exploring the history of jazz.

Sunday, July 16, 2017
“The Golden Age of Jazz.” Screening of the following jazz-themed films: Episode nine, “The Adventure,” from Ken Burns’ documentary “Jazz” at 1 p.m. “What Happened, Miss Simone?” about singer Nina Simone at 1:30 p.m. Episode 10, “A Masterpiece at Midnight,” from Burns’ “Jazz” at 3 p.m. “Miles Ahead” about trumpeter Miles Davis at 3:15 p.m. Presented in partnership with the “Johnson Victrola Museum’s 50th Anniversary Celebration: A Jazz Tale,” a component of a series of programs celebrating the museum’s creation in 1967. Dover Public Library, 35 Loockerman Plaza, Dover. 302-736-7030.

Saturday, July 22, 2017
Delaware State University Summer Bridge Service Project Day. History-related activities presented by Delaware State University students as part of the school’s Jumpstart Program. Johnson Victrola Museum, 375 S. New St., Dover. Program 10 a.m.–3 p.m. Museum open 9 a.m.–4:30 p.m. 302-739-3262.

Saturday, July 22, 2017
Delaware State University Summer Bridge Service Project Day. History-related activities presented by Delaware State University students as part of the school’s Jumpstart Program. The Old State House, 25 The Green, Dover. Program 10 a.m.–3 p.m. Museum open 9 a.m.–4:30 p.m. 302-744-5054.

Saturday, July 22, 2017
Delaware State University Summer Bridge Service Project Day. History-related activities presented by Delaware State University students as part of the school’s Jumpstart Program. John Dickinson Plantation, 340 Kitts Hummock Road, Dover. Program 10 a.m.–3 p.m. Museum open 10 a.m.–4:30 p.m. 302-739-3277.

Saturday, July 22, 2017
Second annual “Movie Night on the Lawn.” Screening of the Disney film “Moana” plus live music, food trucks, lawn games and a photo booth. Luau themed attire is welcomed. Buena Vista Conference Center, 661 S. Dupont Highway (Route 13), New Castle. Activities begin at 6 p.m. Film begins at 8:30 p.m. 302-323-4430.

Historic Buena Vista mansion will host “Movie Night on the Lawn” on Saturday, July 22, 2017.

Historic Buena Vista mansion will host “Movie Night on the Lawn” on Saturday, July 22, 2017.


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events

Wine-glass painting party on June 22, 2017 at Buena Vista mansion

Written on: June 12th, 2017 in EventsHistoric SitesNews

One of Delaware’s most historic homes will host a wine-glass painting party from 6 to 8 p.m. on Thursday, June 22, 2017. The event will take place at the Buena Vista mansion located at 661 S. Dupont Highway (Route 13), in New Castle, Del. Tickets for the event are $40 and are available in advance only at the Painting Parties, LLC website (http://www.painting-parties.com/2-22–wilmington-women-in-business.html). No tickets will be sold at the door. For additional information, call 302-323-4430.

“Spring Flower!” Guests will create hand-painted wine glasses at the painting party event on June 22, 2017.

“Spring Flower!” Guests will create hand-painted wine glasses at the painting party event on June 22, 2017.

The event will feature a professional artist who will provide each guest with step-by-step instruction in creating two, hand-painted wine glasses utilizing the “Spring Flower!” design. Participants will then be able to take their completed glasses home with them.

No art experience is necessary for the painting party and all supplies will be provided including wine glasses, paints, brushes and aprons. A cash bar and light hor d’oeuves provided by Newark’s Caffé Gelato will also be available during the event. The only thing that visitors need to bring is a fun attitude!

Buena Vista mansion.

Buena Vista mansion.

The main section of the Buena Vista mansion was built between 1845 and 1847 by John M. Clayton, United States secretary of state from 1849 to 1850 under presidents Taylor and Fillmore, and United States senator from 1829 to 1836, 1845 to 1849, and 1853 until his death in 1856. The home later became the residence of C. Douglass Buck, governor of Delaware from 1929 to 1937 and United States senator from 1942 to 1948. Buena Vista and its grounds were donated to the state by the Buck family in 1965 and now serve as a conference center administered by the Delaware Division of Historical and Cultural Affairs.

 


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events

“Coming Home, the Toll of War”

Written on: June 12th, 2017 in EventsNews

-Program contrasts the experiences of veterans returning from World War I with those of today-

Richard Claypoole, Vietnam veteran and former director of the Office of the Federal Register at the U.S. National Archives and Records Administration, will  facilitate “Coming Home, the Toll of War,” a program that explores the experiences of veterans returning home following World War I and how they compare with today’s veterans’ experience. The two-part program will take place on Tuesday, June 20, 2017, from 1 to 4:15 p.m., at the Lewes Public Library located at 111 Adams Ave. in Lewes, Del. Admission is free and open to the public. For additional information call 302-645-1148.

National Vietnam Veterans Memorial in Washington, D.C.

National Vietnam Veterans Memorial in Washington, D.C.

The agenda for the program is as follows:

Beginning at 1 p.m.
Part 1: “Soldier’s Home” by Ernest Hemingway
Discussion of Hemingway’s story found in “World War I and America: Told by the Americans Who Lived It.” This fictional context provides for a conversation regarding the lives of veterans returning home following World War I and how that compares with today’s veterans’ experience.

Reading material for the discussion may be obtained at the following Web address: http://history.delaware.gov/museums/zm/events/chautauqua/pdf/At_HomeClipped.pdf

Additional material regarding World War I in America can be found at the following: http://wwiamerica.org/wwi-writers-writings.php

Beginning at 2:45 p.m.
Part 2: “License to Remember”
Viewing and discussion of “License to Remember,” the Delaware Humanities Forum’s 17-minute film focusing on the homecoming reception received by some of Delaware’s Vietnam War veterans and how this experience of returning from war has changed in the last 100 years.

World War I veterans are cheered by crowds during a victory parade in Detroit in 1919.

World War I veterans are cheered by crowds during a victory parade in Detroit in 1919.

“Coming Home, the Toll of War” is a component program of Delaware’s 19th annual Chautauqua tent show, “Service, Suffrage, and Swing: World War I Era in Delaware,” that will take place at a variety of downtown Lewes, Del. locations from June 18–22, 2017. The five-day event is being held in commemoration of the 100th anniversary of the United States’ entry into the “war to end all wars” that was fought between 1914 and 1918. Except where noted, admission is free and open to the public. Go here for a complete listing of Chautauqua activities.

Service, Suffrage, and Swing: World War I Era in Delaware” is co-sponsored by the Delaware Division of Historical and Cultural Affairs and the Lewes Historical Society, and is partially funded by a grant from the Delaware Humanities Forum, a state program of the National Endowment for the Humanities.

Delaware Humanities Forum logo

 


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news

Division employees receive a Delaware Award for Heroism

Written on: June 1st, 2017 in News

As part of the “Delaware Governor’s Awards Ceremony: Recognizing State Employee Individuals, Teams, and Heroes” which was held on May 8, 2017 at Delaware State University in Dover, Gov. John Carney honored a select group of employees and teams for their exemplary service during the past year.

The award recipients included three current members of the Division of Historical and Cultural Affairs’ Preservation Maintenance Team—Greg Buchman, Scott Hayes and James Scott—and one former member—Chris Conley—who, as a group, were presented a Delaware Award for Heroism for their efforts in helping to save the life of one of their fellow employees.

Division of Historical and Cultural Affairs employees Greg Buchman, Scott Hayes and James Scott (center in blue shirts holding their certificates) who were honored with a Delaware Award for Heroism. Pictured from left: Kristopher Knight, Delaware deputy secretary of state; Justice James T. Vaughn, Jr. of the Delaware Supreme Court; Deloris Hayes-Arrington, director of human resources for the Department of Finance; Tim Slavin, director of the Division of Historical and Cultural Affairs; Buchman; Gov. John Carney; Hayes; state Rep. Stephanie T. Bolden; Scott; Michael S. Jackson, secretary of the Office of Management and Budget; and Division of Historical and Cultural Affairs’ physical-plant maintenance supervisor Ed Gillespie. Not pictured: Chris Conley.

Division of Historical and Cultural Affairs employees Greg Buchman, Scott Hayes and James Scott (center in blue shirts holding their certificates) who were honored with a Delaware Award for Heroism. Pictured from left: Kristopher Knight, Delaware deputy secretary of state; Justice James T. Vaughn, Jr. of the Delaware Supreme Court; Deloris Hayes-Arrington, director of human resources for the Department of Finance; Tim Slavin, director of the Division of Historical and Cultural Affairs; Buchman; Gov. John Carney; Hayes; state Rep. Stephanie T. Bolden; Scott; Michael S. Jackson, secretary of the Office of Management and Budget; and Division of Historical and Cultural Affairs’ physical-plant maintenance supervisor Ed Gillespie. Not pictured: Chris Conley.

Following is an excerpt from the materials submitted in support of the employees’ nomination for the award:

On Wednesday, June 29th [2016] at about 3:00 p.m., a [Historical and Cultural Affairs] HCA employee collapsed at a job location. …

HCA employee Chris Conley moved to assist his fallen co-worker while James Scott called other staff members for assistance. Staff quickly confirmed that their co-worker was unresponsive with no detectable pulse, and they did not believe he was breathing. The situation was urgent and critical.

Chris Conley and Scott Hayes immediately began CPR while … Greg Buchman provided information to the 911 dispatcher. James Scott and Chris Conley traded places delivering CPR, with assistance from Scott Hayes, while all waited for the arrival of the paramedics. Staff continued CPR until the arrival of paramedics from Kent County EMS.

With the arrival of the paramedics, staff stepped aside while the paramedics began medical assessment and treatment. At this time, Greg Buchman …, at the request of the paramedics, sought needed personal information regarding the patient from the division office. Paramedics were successful in reviving the HCA employee and initiated transport to Bayhealth Medical Center.

On Wednesday, June 29th these … HCA colleagues saved the life of one of their co-workers. Historical and Cultural Affairs offers courses in CPR and AED certification to all staff; these team members had taken advantage of that training and were able to provide life-saving measures.

These … HCA employees worked flawlessly in a very stressful and emotional situation. Their courage, professionalism, and care are a model of all HCA employees.

The Delaware Award for Heroism was established in 2013 and is presented to employees who have demonstrated outstanding judgment, exceptional courage, extraordinary decisiveness and presence of mind, and unusual swiftness of action, regardless of their own personal safety, in the attempt to save or protect human life and/or property. Their acts have been deemed to be above and beyond the call of duty.


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