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  Archived Posts From: 2015

Developments in Cultural and Historical Resources Information Systems (CHRIS)

Written on: November 24th, 2015 in NewsPreservation

The following article appeared in the Oct. 30, 2015 edition of NCSHPO News, an e-news publication of the National Conference of State Historic Preservation Officers.

For the past two years, the Delaware State Historic Preservation Office (part of the Division of Historical and Cultural Affairs) has focused staff and resources on a major redevelopment of its on-line mapping portal, the Cultural and Historical Resources Information System (CHRIS). Utilizing funds from the HPF Grant and from the Delaware Department of State, the Delaware SHPO hired GeoDecisions to upgrade the CHRIS to an easier, more flexible and cost-efficient system based on ESRI’s ArcGIS On-Line (AGOL).

National Register locations in Delaware from the updated version of CHRIS.

National Register locations in Delaware from the updated version of CHRIS.

The new CHRIS launched in February 2015, receiving many positive comments from users. Major benefits of the new system are the ability for consultants and agencies to map and submit survey forms online, the ability for in-house management and updating of data, improved management of user accounts to protect confidential information, a tool for creating public-oriented, thematic “story maps,” and the ability to deliver more extensive survey and National Register information.

This initiative includes ongoing efforts to digitize and upload survey data. In recent months, the Delaware SHPO joined several other state agencies participating in a new scanning program. Delaware Governor Jack Martel established a partnership with Specialisterne, a company that works with and secures employment for people on the autism spectrum, and Computer Aid, Inc. (CAI) which employs such workers with skills that are ideal for technology projects. Such skills include focused concentration, attention to detail, an ability to recognize patterns and deviations in data, and thinking outside the box. The CAI employees are scanning thousands of inventory forms and photographs for CHRIS. One of the new tools of the system will allow staff to upload the newly scanned files from CAI to the historic properties’ points in bulk, which will vastly cut down on the time needed to accomplish this task. The Delaware SHPO is well on its way to its goal of providing 24/7 access to comprehensive information on Delaware’s historic properties.

One of the preservation office’s 33,000 photographic-inventory cards that are being scanned by CAI associates.

One of the preservation office’s 33,000 photographic-inventory cards that are being scanned by CAI associates.

 

 

 

 

 

 


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Edward McWilliams earns state of Delaware’s Management Development Certificate

Written on: November 24th, 2015 in News

In a commencement ceremony held on Oct. 22, 2015, Edward McWilliams, manager of the Division of Historical and Cultural Affairs’ Collections, Affiliates, Research and Exhibits (CARE) Team, was awarded the Management Development Certificate from the state of Delaware’s Office of Statewide Training and Organizational Development.

Edward McWilliams holding his Management Development Certificate at the Oct. 22, 2015 Statewide Training and Organizational Development commencement ceremony. From left, Robert Coupe, commissioner, Department of Correction, the ceremony’s keynote speaker; Brenda Lakeman, director of Human Resource Management and Statewide Benefits; McWilliams; Barbara McCleary, manager of Statewide Training and Organizational Development; and James C. Terry, program coordinator of the Management Development Certificate program.

Edward McWilliams holding his Management Development Certificate at the Oct. 22, 2015 Statewide Training and Organizational Development commencement ceremony. From left, Robert Coupe, commissioner, Department of Correction, the ceremony’s keynote speaker; Brenda Lakeman, director of Human Resource Management and Statewide Benefits; McWilliams; Barbara McCleary, manager of Statewide Training and Organizational Development; and James C. Terry, program coordinator of the Management Development Certificate program.

The Management Development Certificate was developed in the fall of 2003. Since that time 72 state employees have enrolled in the program which offers supervisors and managers statewide a comprehensive and progressive series of developmental opportunities to continually improve their performance. McWilliams joins the ranks of a very elite group of only seven state employees to graduate from this challenging program.

During the course of his studies, which took place from 2013 to 2015, McWilliams was required to attend 13 required courses and four elective courses, prepare course-summary notes, complete a year-long project, prepare a written report and make a live presentation before program evaluators.

As his certificate project, McWilliams led an inter-organization partnership that created “Forging Faith, Building Freedom: African American Faith Experiences in Delaware, 1800–1980,” an exhibit that explored the state’s black community, its faith experiences and its contributions to the development of religion in the United States. On display from Sept. 27, 2013 to June 14, 2014 at the Delaware History Museum, a unit of the Delaware Historical Society in Wilmington, Del., the exhibit was created by the society’s curatorial staff, which researched and wrote the exhibit narrative and organized loans of exhibited objects; and the CARE team which designed, fabricated and installed the exhibit. In September 2014, the exhibit was the recipient of the American Association for State and Local History’s prestigious History in Progress Award.

During comments at the commencement ceremony, McWilliams discussed his experience in the certificate program and how it will guide him in service to Delaware’s people as a manager within state government. In an interview for this blog, McWilliams praised the program and its instructors, particularly his advisor Marianna Freilich who “demanded the highest standards but who also gave countless hours of encouragement. I would not have been able to complete this program without her support and friendship.”

Edward McWilliams (center) with Marianna Freilich (left) and James C. Terry.

Edward McWilliams (center) with Marianna Freilich (left) and James C. Terry.

A native of Wilmington, Del. who currently resides in Laurel, Del., McWilliams has been a Division of Historical and Cultural Affairs employee since 1996 when he began service as site supervisor of the John Dickinson Plantation. He served as curator of exhibits from 2001 until July 2011 when he was named manager of the newly formed CARE Team. In 2009, he was named the Delaware Department of State’s employee of the year. He holds a bachelor’s degree in art history from the University of Delaware and a master’s degree in arts management from the American University in Washington, D.C.

 

 


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Gov. Markell pardons Underground Railroad conductor Samuel D. Burris

Written on: November 10th, 2015 in News

In a ceremony held on Nov. 2, 2015 in the courtroom of Dover, Del.’s Old State House, Gov. Jack Markell issued a pardon of Samuel D. Burris, a free black man from the Willow Grove area of Kent County, Del., who was convicted on Nov. 2, 1847 of aiding slaves escaping from their owners. The ceremony took place in the very location where Burris was convicted 168 years ago.

Samuel D. Burris

Samuel D. Burris

As a conductor on the Underground Railroad, Burris is known to have successfully led several enslaved people from Maryland and Delaware to relative freedom in Pennsylvania. In 1847, he was captured and charged in three cases with enticing away slaves. Found guilty in two of the cases, he was fined, sentenced to prison and thereafter sentenced to be sold into servitude. After being purchased for $500 by a Wilmington abolitionist, he was taken to Philadelphia where he was reunited with family and friends. He continued to work for the abolitionist cause until his death in San Francisco in 1863.

As part of his remarks, Markell noted, “This pardon is an extraordinary act in recognition of a historic wrong that cannot be corrected by a single stroke of a pen. … While we cannot change what was done more than 150 years ago, we can ensure that Mr. Burris’ legacy is appropriately recognized and celebrated. We affirm today that history will no longer record his actions as criminal, but rather as acts of freedom and bravery in the face of injustice.”

Surrounded by Burris-family descendants, Gov. Jack Markell holds the document pardoning Samuel D. Burris. In the foreground at the far left is Ocea Thomas. At far right is the Rev. Ralph D. Smith, Sr.

Surrounded by Burris-family descendants, Gov. Jack Markell holds the document pardoning Samuel D. Burris. In the foreground at the far left is Ocea Thomas. At far right is the Rev. Ralph D. Smith, Sr.

Other highlights of the ceremony included an invocation by the Rev. Ralph D. Smith, Sr., and a reading by Ocea Thomas from a March 29, 1848 letter that Burris wrote to a friend while he was imprisoned in the Dover jail that was located just a few steps from where the ceremony took place. Smith and Thomas are Burris-family descendants.

Quoting from Burris’ letter, which was published under the headline “Letter From Another Martyr in the Cause of Freedom” in the June 30, 1848 edition of abolitionist William Lloyd Garrison’s newspaper, The Liberator, Thomas read “… for liberty is the word with me, and I would not consent to be President upon any terms that be mentioned, for I consider the lowest condition in life, with freedom attending it, is better than the most exalted station under the restraints of slavery.”

Historical marker honoring Samuel D. Burris.

Historical marker honoring Samuel D. Burris.

The ceremony also included the dedication of a new historical marker honoring Burris near the location of the abolitionist’s home at the intersection of Route 10 (Willow Grove Road) and Henry Cowgill Road southwest of Camden, Del. The site is located along the route of the Harriet Tubman Underground Railroad Byway in Delaware.

Musical offerings at the pardon ceremony included performances by the Caesar Rodney High School VOX ONE vocal jazz ensemble and the Interdenominational Chorus of Dover. Government officials in attendance included state Sen. David G. Lawson and state Reps. William R. Outten and Lyndon Yearick, sponsors of the Burris historical marker; Secretary of State Jeffrey W. Bullock; Stephen Marz, director of the Delaware Public Archives which administers the historical marker program; and Tim Slavin, director of the Division of Historical and Cultural Affairs, who served as master of ceremonies.

Division staff members who provided invaluable historical research on the life and accomplishments of Samuel D. Burris include Madeline Dunn who in the 1990s initiated the division’s research into Delaware’s African-American history and who subsequently developed interpretive programs on that history that are still offered at the division’s museums; Beverly Laing, who has been conducting research specifically on Burris since 1996; and Cindy Snyder and Gloria Henry, site supervisors respectively of the New Castle Court House Museum and the John Dickinson Plantation, who have been studying the history of African Americans at their sites. Finally, Robin Krawitz, formerly the division’s National Register of Historic Places coordinator and currently program director of Delaware State University’s Historic Preservation program, conducted extensive research on Burris during her tenure at the division. Krawitz is currently working on a book about Burris that will be published by the Delaware Heritage Commission.

Go to the following for photographs and a video of the Burris pardon ceremony.

For press articles about the ceremony, go to the following:

Delaware Governor Markell pardons a historic hero
Newsworks, WHYY TV, Philadelphia, Pa.—Nov. 13, 2015

Black History Matters: Governor Pardons Abolitionist–After 168 Years
New America Media, San Francisco, Calif.—Nov. 11, 2015

Underground Railroad Conductor Pardoned 168 Years After Conviction
History Channel, New York, N.Y.—Nov. 3, 2015

Delaware governor pardons man who helped slaves escape
WMDT TV, Salisbury, Md.—Nov. 2, 2015

Delaware governor pardons abolitionist who helped slaves escape
CBS News, New York, N.Y.—Nov. 2, 2015

Delaware Pardons an Underground Railroad ‘Hero’
New York Times, N.Y.—Nov. 2, 2015

Free black man who helped scores of slaves escape to the North on the Underground Railroad receives official pardon
Daily Mail, London, U.K.—Nov. 2, 2015

Gov. Jack Markell pardons Delaware abolitionist
The News Journal, Wilmington, Del.—Nov 2, 2015

Governor pardons abolitionist Samuel Burris
Delaware State News, Dover, Del.—Nov. 2, 2015

Kent County Underground Railroad Conductor Pardoned
WBOC TV, Salisbury, Md.—Nov. 2, 2015

Man who helped slaves escape pardoned 168 years after conviction
Fox News, New York, N.Y.—Nov. 2, 2015

Markell pardons Delaware Underground Railroad abolitionist
WDEL Radio, Wilmington, Del.—Nov. 2, 2015

Pardoned for his “crime” 168 year later
WPVI TV, Philadelphia, Pa.—Nov. 2, 2015

Posthumous pardon for Delaware man who helped slaves escape in 1847
Reuters, London, U.K.—Nov. 2, 2015

Righting a wrong: Delaware pardons man who guided slaves to freedom
CNN, Atlanta, Ga.—Nov. 2, 2015

Samuel D. Burris pardon is 10 a.m.
Dover Post, Del.—Nov. 1, 2015

 


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